What is the definition of a healthy diet?

What is the definition of a healthy diet?

Pretty Simple – Mix of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats, plus enough vitamins and minerals for optimal health. Science says that some of the food choices within these categories are better than others.

Are there foods you never should eat? Nothing really. If you crave an ice cream sundae occasionally, have a small one. But don’t make it a daily event. Set off the samosas at parties with healthier snacks at home. Healthy eating making right food choice most of the time.

Nutrition scientists have compiled the following list of foods you should keep to a minimum. Research suggests that eating these foods regularly can create the onset of life-threatening illnesses such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and even some cancers.

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White carbohydrates. Bread, pasta, rice, cookies, cake — are best had in the whole-grain versions.
Added sugar. Irrespective of Whether it’s white granulated sugar, brown sugar, high- fructose corn syrup, corn sugar, or honey, sugar contains almost no nutrients and is pure carbohydrate. When we are eating a lot of sugar you are filling up on empty calories, causing our blood sugar to rise and fall like a roller coaster.

Research has proven that soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages are the primary source of added sugar in all our diets and a major contributor to weight gain.

Dairy fat. Ice cream, whole milk, and cheese are full of saturated fat and some naturally occurring trans-fat and therefore can increase the risk of the health problems, notably heart disease. The healthiest milk and milk products are low-fat versions, such as skim milk, milk with 1% fat and reduced-fat cheeses.

Baked sweets. Cookies, snack cakes, doughnuts, pastries, and many other treats are so tempting and we can’t but hog on them, but these commercially prepared versions are packed with processed carbohydrates, added sugar, unhealthy fats, and salt.

Dietary guidelines and the American Heart Association recommend reducing sodium to 1,500 mg per day and not exceeding 2,300 mg per day. But most of us get 1½ teaspoons (or 8,500 mg) of salt daily. That translates to about 3,400 mg of daily sodium. Our body needs a certain amount of sodium, but too much can increase blood pressure and the risk of heart disease and stroke.

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