Minestrone Soup

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Minestrone Soup

  • Author: Banhishikha
  • Prep Time: 10 Minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 - 40 Minutes
  • Total Time: 40 - 50 Minutes
  • Yield: 4 1x

Description

Minestrone soup is a thick Italian soup, made with vegetables, addition of pasta, noodles or rice. Common ingredients include beans, onions, celery, carrots and tomatoes. The food is a traditional dish in Italy. Milestrone soup was traditionally made to use up leftover vegetables, so feel free to use any seasonal vegetables and greens. It can be used as detoxification and also helps to stimulate the purification of the liver and the entire body and a good source of multiple Vitamins and Minerals. Essentially, minestrone is a thick, hearty variety of vegetable soup. There is no set recipe for minestrone, since it can be usually made out of whatever vegetables are at one’s disposal. it can be vegetarian, contain meat, or contain an animal bone based stock (such as chicken stock)

Minestrone soup is a healthy and quick to make nutritious recipe, can be consumed in breakfast, lunch, dinner or as a snack item. always try to serve hot to enjoy the taste.


Scale

Ingredients

  • Onion 30 gm
  • Carrot – 50 gm
  • French Beans – 40 gm
  • Celery – 20 gm
  • Salt – 0.5 tsp
  • Freshly grounded
  • Black pepper – 0.5 tsp
  • Small macaroni – 100 gm
  • Kidney beans – 50 gm
  • Tomato – 100 gm
  • Garlic- 8 cloves
  • Oil – 20 ml

Instructions

  1. Chop onion, garlic, carrot, French beans, celery and tomatoes.
  2. Heat oil in a pan.
  3. Add the chopped onions, garlic, carrot, French beans and celery over a medium flame and cook until the vegetables soften and stir occasionally.
  4. Add vegetable stock, salt, pepper and bring it to boil and cook about for 10 minutes.
  5. Add tomatoes and macaroni and peas; simmer for 15 to 20 minutes more.
  6. Taste for seasoning and adjust to taste.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 90 - 92 kcal
  • Fat: 5 - 6 gm
  • Carbohydrates: 10 - 12 gm
  • Protein: 15 - 16 gm

Keywords: #HEALTHYSOUP

Moong Dal Cheela/Pancake Recipe

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Moong Dal Cheela/Pancake Recipe

  • Author: Mubarra
  • Prep Time: 5 - 10 Minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 Minutes
  • Total Time: 12 minute
  • Category: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snack
  • Cuisine: Indian
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Description

Moong dal Cheela/Pancake is a healthy, delicious and quick to make recipe that can be consumed as a breakfast or snack item. It can be made with minimal ingredients and within minutes given, that the Moong dal is soaked overnight or for few hours before preparation. It can be served without any sides but it tastes best when served with homemade chutneys/pickle/curd/raita.

 


Scale

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup Moong Dal (whole or split with husk) 
  • 1 tablespoon Green Peas
  • 1 tablespoon Water
  • 2 teaspoons of finely chopped Onion
  • 1/4 teaspoon of finely chopped Ginger 
  • 1/4 teaspoon of finely chopped  Coriander leaves 
  • Salt to taste
  • 1/4  teaspoon of finely chopped Green Chili 
  • 1  teaspoon ghee or Oil

Instructions

  • Wash and soak the moong dal for around 3-4 hours prior to making the batter.
  • Then take the soaked and drained moong dal, blend it in a mixer along with green chillies, green peas, ginger, using little water to make a thick paste.
  • In a bowl, add onion, coriander leaves, salt and the blended moong dal and peas paste.
  • Mix well and add water to make a thin dosa like batter. Remember to add water in small batches to get your desired consistency (Medium thick consistency)
  • Heat a large nonstick frying pan on medium-high heat. Add a little oil to coat the pan.
  • Pour a ladle full of batter when the pan is hot and flatten out until 1cm thick. 
  • Pour a little oil on either side and cook until golden brown.
  • Flip and cook on the other side. 
  • Serve hot with any Chutney/Pickle/Salsa/Curry

Notes

The Moong dal Cheela/Pancake can be stuffed with or topped with vegetables of your choice to make it more nutritionally balanced.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 167.75 Kcal
  • Fat: 5.325 g
  • Carbohydrates: 21.11 g
  • Protein: 8.79 g

Keywords: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snack, healthy, vegetarian, Protein, weightloss

Vegetable Dalia

 

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Vegetable Dalia

  • Author: Meenu Agarwal
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 20
  • Total Time: 30 mins
  • Yield: 1 1x

Description

Dalia is very popular all over India. Vegetable Dalia is considered to be one of the simplest, healthier and scrumptious one pot vegan meal. This is low in fat, high in Iron and fiber, and its best dish for everyone. Vegetable Dalia is very easy where the Broken Wheat Aka cracked wheat/Dalia, vegetables, basic Indian spices are cooked with Onion, ginger, garlic based tempering. Bulgur Wheat, is a healthy alternative to whole wheat as it contains the outer bran, which makes it an excellent source of dietary fiber.  Dalia is low in fats that not only aids in weight management but also prevents Obesity. So replacing wheat rotis or rice with Dalia is not a bad idea to boost your weight loss efforts. Dalia is also good for Diabetic and Gluten Intolerance patient.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Dalia
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1/2 tsp ginger paste
  • 1 green chili, finely chopped
  • 1 small tomato, finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup chopped carrots
  • ¼ cup chopped potatoes
  • ¼ cup shelled green peas/fresh or frozen
  • 2 cups water
  • ½ tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp cooking oil
  • salt as required
  • ¼ tsp Red chili powder
  • ¼ tsp turmeric powder

Instructions

1) Heat cooking oil in a pan. Add cumin seeds and let it crackle.

2) Add chopped onions and sauté till they become transparent. Now add chopped ginger, green chilies and sauté properly.

3) Add chopped tomato and sauté for 1 minute. Now add all the veggies of your choice and sauté till the vegetables are soft and tender.

4) Rinse the Dalia and add to the veggies. Stir for 3-4 minutes. Add 2 cups water and all the vegetables. Stir well occasionally till Dalia is cooked well.

5) If the Dalia has not cooked completely, then add some more water and cook on low medium flame without the lid till they are softened.

6) Garnish vegetable Dalia with chopped coriander leaves and sprinkle lemon juice on top.

7) Serve hot with coriander chutney.



Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 250 - 260 KCAL
  • Fat: 12 – 15 GM
  • Carbohydrates: 40 - 50 GM
  • Protein: 6 – 8 GM

Obesity worldwide

Worldwide obesity has more than doubled since 1980. In 2014, more than 1.9 billion adults, 18 years and older, were overweight. Of these over 600 million were obese. 39% of adults aged 18 years and over were overweight in 2014, and 13% were obese. Most of the world’s population live in countries where overweight and obesity kills more people than underweight. 42 million children under the age of 5 were overweight or obese in 2013.

9 out of 10 people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes are overweight. If you are overweight, losing some weight could help you better manage your diabetes.Obesity is preventable.

The fundamental cause of obesity and overweight is an energy imbalance between calories consumed and calories spent.

Are we among the above or some of our near and dear ones among the above. If yes, then what are we doing about it. It is good to be busy, but it is a not a great idea to be busy now and regret later in life. The diseases that come with being overweight are irreversible. No amount of money can get us back to our old healthier self.

It is high time for us to become aware of if we are within the healthy weight zone or, overweight. Overweight and obesity are both extremely dangerous and lead to some serious health issues like

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· High blood pressure (Hypertension)
· High Cholesterol or high levels of triglycerides (Dyslipidemia)
· Type 2 diabetes
· Coronary heart disease
· Stroke
· Osteoarthritis (a breakdown of cartilage and bone within a joint)
· Sleep apnea and breathing problems
· Some cancers (endometrial, breast, colon, kidney, gallbladder, and liver)
· Low quality of life
· Mental illness such as clinical depression, anxiety, and other mental disorders.
· Body pain and difficulty with physical functioning.

We all have either made half- hearted attempts to bring our body weight within the healthy zone or a minimum risk zone, with various degree of success. It is not a great idea not to care about our body, as we risk taking body into a critical ailment zone. If we don’t take care of it or even start thinking of now, we may land up some of above ailments and then taking medical treatment or a starvation – diet treatment.
None of these 2 options are great for us, as we will be forced to accept change in our lifestyles.
Food and Wellness works with clients to be able to understand the root causes of excess weight and customizes diet plans providing the best achievable solution over a reasonable time span. Its time for specialised health care for your body as each of us are unique. What works for me may not work for others.

Obesity: Why its a serious global concern

In a fast-moving world of today, the list of our health concerns keep growing by the day. Gone are the days when there was sufficient time in a day to dedicate towards eating right and living healthy. Our priorities now have changed and personal health has taken a backseat in that list.

It is therefore a serious issue that the major health concerns of today sprout not from monumental mistakes but from very tiny missteps that we take every day in an increasingly unhealthy lifestyle we lead today.

And one of the most significant of those concerns is obesity.

Overweight and obesity are defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair health. The WHO defines it as:

  • A BMI greater than or equal to 25 is overweight
  • A BMI greater than or equal to 30 is obesity.

Body mass index (BMI) is a simple index of weight-for-height that is commonly used to classify overweight and obesity in adults. It is defined as a person’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of his height in meters (kg/m2).

Here are some statistics as revealed by WHO that sheds some light on the appalling nature of this condition:

  • Worldwide obesity has more than doubled since 1980.
  • In 2014, more than 1.9 billion adults, 18 years and older, were overweight. Of these, over 600 million were obese.
  • 39% of adults aged 18 years and over were overweight in 2014, and 13% were obese. Overall, about 13% of the world’s adult population (11% of men and 15% of women) were obese in 2014.
  • 42 million children under the age of 5 were overweight or obese in 2013.
Photo credit: Robin Stickel from Pexels

So what causes obesity?

Like mentioned earlier, the most threatening part of the problem is that it has its source embedded right into the most basic of activities that we do or fail to do in our daily lives. Technically, it can be said that the fundamental cause of obesity and overweight is an energy imbalance between calories consumed and calories expended. Globally the general trend in the present lifestyle has been:

  • An increased intake of energy-dense foods that are high in fat; and
  • An increase in physical inactivity due to the increasingly sedentary nature of many forms of work, changing modes of transportation, and increasing urbanization.

Why obesity is different from ‘being fat’

While being of a slightly overweight body type isn’t a matter of concern, being obese goes way beyond just looking fat. It brings with it serious threats to health. Risk factors associated are cardiovascular diseases (mainly heart disease and stroke), diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders,some cancers(breast and colon).

Childhood obesity is associated with a higher chance of obesity, premature death and disability in adulthood. But in addition to increased future risks, obese children experience breathing difficulties, increased risk of fractures, hypertension, early markers of cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance and psychological effects.

Cures and preventive measures

However, all is not lost and overweight and obesity are curable with diet and lifestyle changes. Here are some of the ways in which you can cure yourself out of overweight and obesity issues:

  • Limit energy intake from total fats and sugars;
  • Increase consumption of fruit and vegetables, as well as legumes, whole grains and nuts;
  • Engage in regular physical activity (60 minutes a day for children and 150 minutes per week for adults).

Nevertheless, when obesity goes beyond the control of home remedies or serious health issues crop up as a result, it is always important to take expert help instead of experimenting with one’s health. Food n Wellness advises clients on how overweight and obesity can be controlled.

Please contact our expert, Mrs. Meenu Agarwal @+65 96479240 or [email protected].

To end on a positive note, it is not humongous a task to prevent or cure obesity. A slight change in our daily activities and a disciplined commitment towards our health and wellbeing goes a very long way. And we believe that it is certainly more rewarding to be responsible in our choice of lifestyle than to fight endless battles with health issues all our life!

Water: For weight loss and numerous health benefits

I have often heard, both my clients over a consultation, or friends over a casual talk about weight-loss techniques & complaining why losing weight is such a humongous effort, and wish there was a magic cure to weight loss.

I’ll have to say here, there is .

Now when I say “magic” I don’t mean it in an incredulous, overnight way. What I mean is that it works in the most simplified way, as opposed to intricately crafted complicated ways of losing weight. Plus, there are numerous advantages to it than just losing weight. I don’t think there is a better definition of magic than this in today’s time.

As the heading suggests, that genie in the bottle is indeed, water.

So how does water help

We all know water is important for survival, but here’s how water functions for our body:

Water Can Help Control Calories: For years, dieters have been drinking lots of water as a weight loss strategy. Water helps you feel full. It has zero calories, so substituting calorie-loaded drinks with water can easily cut several hundred empty calories from your diet each day. Water also helps regulate metabolism and increases energy levels.

In absence of sufficient water, you also tend to eat more and gain weight. A 2010 research by the Institute for Public Health and Water Research found that those who drank almost “2 eight ounce glasses of water before each meal consumed 75 to 90 fewer calories while eating.” When you are drinking enough water, you are also feeding the cells and tissues in your body that gets the enzymatic system moving, which actually releases fat toxins out of the body.

Helps Maintain Normal Bowel Function: You must have heard parents and grandparents stressing on the importance of a healthy stomach as a means to keep most ailments at bay. By not eliminating food that we digest we not only gain weight, but also gain toxins. Adequate hydration keeps things flowing along your gastrointestinal tract and prevents constipation.

Keeps our kidneys working: Kidneys remove waste from our bodies, help control our blood pressure, and balance fluids, so they’re crucial to keeping our systems running smoothly. Harvard Medical School notes an effective way to prevent kidney stones is to stay hydrated. Water can dilute the chemicals which can turn into crystals, so drinking enough water is very important. Harvard recommends at least two liters – eight glasses – a day to keep your body healthy.

Aids in preventing heart diseases: Keeping the body hydrated helps the heart easily pump blood through the blood vessels to the muscles. And, it helps the muscles work efficiently. If you’re well hydrated, your heart doesn’t have to work as hard and hence reduce heart attacks.

Slows down process of skin ageing and wrinkling: Many studies have proven that water makes skin firm, fills in fine lines and wrinkles and brightens an uneven complexion.

Kaiser Permanent nephrologist Steven Guest, MD, agrees: “Fluid losses occur continuously, from skin evaporation, breathing, urine, and stool, and these losses must be replaced daily for good health.”

Prevent headaches, naturally. Going without water for too long causes headaches for some people, and has been identified as a migraine trigger. The good news is that in a study on the effects of water on headaches, participants experienced “total relief” from their headaches within 30 minutes of drinking water (two cups, on average)

Help keep us alert. If you’re going to need to concentrate for long periods of time, keep water handy to help you stay refreshed, hydrated, and focused. Dehydration can impair your attention span, memory, and motor skills

Protects our joints and cartilage. Water keeps the cartilage around our joints hydrated and supple, ensuring that our joints stay lubricated. It also protects our spinal cord and tissues, keeping us healthy inside out.

Photo credit: Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

It might protect against some types of cancer: Research has found that the greater the fluid intake, the lower the incidence of bladder cancer, with more significant results when the fluid is water. One possible reason could be that urinating more frequently prevents the buildup of bladder carcinogens. Staying hydrated may also reduce the risk of colon cancer and breast cancer.

Fight dehydration: The how-to guide

The first sign of dehydration is fatigue. When your water intake does not equal your output, you can become dehydrated. When the body begins to dehydrate, it normally means the tissues are not getting enough water to make a person feel energetic. Dehydration has also been looked upon as a migraine-trigger. Fluid losses are accentuated in warmer climates, during strenuous exercise, in high altitudes, and in older adults, whose sense of thirst may not be as sharp.

European Food Safety Authority recommends that women should drink about 1.6 litres of fluid and men should drink about 2.0 litres of fluid per day. That’s about eight glasses of 200ml each for a woman, and 10 glasses of 200ml each for a man.

However, your size, the temperature and how active you are can all make a difference (so if you’re exercising a lot on a hot day, you’ll need to drink more).

The American College of Sports Medicine guidelines for fluid intake before and during physical activity recommend that people drink about 17 ounces of fluid about two hours before exercise. During exercise, they recommend that people start drinking fluids early, and drink them at regular intervals to replace fluids lost by sweating.

5 Tips to Help You Drink More:

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  • Keep a bottle of water handy at all times in your car, at your desk, or in your bag.
  • Have a beverage with every snack and meal. You’re likely to drink more liquids if you like the way they taste, although try and avoid aerated drinks or beverages loaded with too much sugar or artificial flavorings.
  • You can add natural flavorings like mint, lemon or cucumber to your water if you’re not fond of drinking plain water.
  • Eat more fruits and vegetables. Their high water content will add to your hydration. About 20% of our fluid intake comes from foods.
  • Choose beverages that meet your individual needs. If you’re watching calories, go for non-caloric beverages or water. Beverages like green tea, all-natural juices and smoothies are a reliable way to increase water intake without any harm.

Finally More water please

These recommendations are for healthy adult men and women, not children. If you suffer from diseases like heart failure, kidney disease, diabetes or other nutritional disorders, please consult with your primary care provider before making changes to your lifestyle.

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