Intermittent fasting

Intermittent fasting is also called “alternate day fasting” or “intermittent energy restriction.” It is the process of fasting and feasting alternately. It consists of eating very little or nothing at all on certain days of the week or times of the day.

‘Intermittent fasting’ involves alternating cycles of eating and fasting without specifying which types of foods can be eaten on non-fasting days. On a fasting day, a person’s intake is often limited to non-calorific fluids such as water, tea, coffee and diet drinks, or it may allow a very restricted amount of daily calories. Intermittent fasting has gained popularity over the past decade, but many people are still confused about what fasting entails. Intermittent fasting involves a short period of not eating followed by a period of eating freely. Fasting does not equate to starvation, and with all intermittent fasting regimens, get to eat every day.

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Intermittent fasting is in trend and type of eating pattern in which we have to practice to limit the food intake in a way, that cycles between defined periods of fasting and non fasting. Intermittent fasting is a type of eating with restricted calorie consumption or use reserved calories as fuel for the body.  It is the type of fasting restrictive diet and thus it is categorized under FAD Diet.

During periods of fasting, it’s important to consume lots of protein. Consuming at least 50 grams of protein on the fast day will help keep hunger at bay and muscle mass high. Examples of high protein fast day meals include shakes with lots of Greek yogurt, fruits and veggies, or a large salad with lean meat, eggs, legumes or nuts. Intermittent fasting regimens involve periods of not eating followed by a period of eating freely. It is important to consume protein during periods of fasting. Intermittent fasting can be an effective way to achieve a healthy body weight.

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Types of intermittent fasting

There is more than one way to implement intermittent fasting, and different methods will produce different results.

  • A 20-hour fast every day. This fast ends with one big meal each evening. During the 20 hour fasting period, raw fruits, vegetables, and some lean protein is allowed.
  • The 5:2 system. In this method, fasting is done any two non-consecutive days of the week. On fasting days, either one can consume nothing at all or limits to 500-600 calories. The other 5 days of the week, eating isn’t restricted.
  • The Eat-Stop-Eat diet – This is a variation of the 6:1 diet which can include two 24-hour fasts per week; this involves fasting for 24 hours, once or twice a week, for example by not eating from dinner one day until dinner the next day.
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  • The 16:8 diet – This is a type of fasting for 16 hours per day by consuming all meals within an eight-hour window. Also called the Lean-gains protocol, it involves skipping breakfast and restricting daily eating period to 8 hours, such as 1–9 p.m. Then fasting for 16 hours in between.
  • Extended overnight fast. In this version  just lengthen overnight fast to last 14 hours. In other words, to fit regular meals into a span of 10 hours and fast for 14 hours overnight. This way most of the fast occurs while sleeping – painless.
  • Alternate day fasting. This consists of eating regularly one day, 20% of your normal intake the next (about 400 calories), and repeating that pattern continuously.

The most researched intermittent fasting methods are included and explained:

1. Lean-gains Daily Intermittent Fasting:

It is a 16–hour fast followed by an 8–hour eating period. Lean-gains intermittent fasting is done every day, so it becomes very easy to get into the habit of eating on this schedule. This is a great method for achieving and maintaining a lean physique.

HOW TO DO IT:
  • Fast for 16 hours every day (about 8 hours of the fast will take place while sleeping).
  • Eat first meal of the day after the 16-hour fast.
  • After 8 hours first meal, start another 16-hour fast.
  • It does not matter when to start the 8-hour feeding period.
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2. Weekly Intermittent Fasting 

If one is looking to bulk up or keep weight on, then this is a great option. Since this is only cutting out two meals per week and can enjoy many physiological benefits of fasting without losing weight.

HOW TO DO IT:
  • Fast for 24 hours every week (about 8 hours of the fast will take place while sleeping).
  • In this example, lunch on Monday is the last meal of the day. Then fast until lunch on Tuesday.

3. Alternate Day Intermittent Fasting (Fast for alternating 24-hour periods)

This style of intermittent fasting is often used in research studies, but, it isn’t very popular in the real world.

HOW TO DO IT:
  • Every other evening start a 24-hour fast (about 8 hours of the fast will take place while sleeping). In the example below, would finish the dinner and begin a 24-hour fast on Monday at 8 pm.
  • Break the fast and start a 24-hour feeding period every other evening. For example, one can start fasting on Monday at 8 pm and eat the next meal on Tuesday at 8 pm.
  • Ideally, the alternate day intermittent fasting schedule should allow to eat at least one meal a day.

Fed and Fasted

There are some true benefits of fasting, as well as some dangers, and some claims are not backed up by science.

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Based on studies over the past two years from the National Institutes of Health and the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, when done correctly, fasting can have positive benefits. Scientists are still researching on the topic, but so far there is good news. Intermittent fasting has been linked to decreases in weight, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and inflammation. Diabetes, heart disease, and blood sugar levels were also lowered in people who fasted. Fasting wasn’t linked to significant fatigue or mental impairments either.

Fasting every other day, or going for too long without food may led to serious starvation-like effects such as heart and organ damage and muscle loss. People also stayed hungry while they fasted, no matter how long they kept up the diet.

Fed state

  1. Insulin high.  2. Glucose high. 3. Burning glucose. 4. Storing fat.

 Fasted State

  1. Insulin low. 2. Glucose low. 3. Liberating fat. 4. Burning fat

Changes that takes place during Fasting

  • Human Growth Hormone (HGH): The levels of growth hormone skyrocket, increasing as much as 5 -fold. This has benefits for fat loss and muscle gain.
  • Insulin: Insulin sensitivity improves and levels of insulin drop dramatically. Lower insulin levels make stored body fat more accessible.
  • Cellular repair: When fasted, cells initiate cellular repair processes. This includes autophagy, where cells digest and remove old and dysfunctional proteins that build up inside cells.
  • Gene expression: There are changes in the function of genes related to longevity and protection against disease. These changes in hormone levels, cell function and gene expression are responsible for the health benefits of intermittent fasting.

Fasting is an effective way of achieving a healthy body weight.

In a recent year-long study, adults with obesity lost 6% of body weight (approximately 13 pounds) and maintained this weight loss with alternate day fasting. Studies also support the use of 5:2 and 16:8 for weight loss. After 3-6 months of 5:2 or 16:8, people with obesity decreased body weight by 3 – 7% (8 -15 pounds). Intermittent fasting can also help reduce the risk of developing heart disease and diabetes. Recent evidence shows that fasting can lower “bad” LDL cholesterol by up 15%, triglycerides by up to 25%, and raise “good” HDL cholesterol by up to 10%. Blood pressure also decreases by 5 -10 mm Hg with various fasting regimens. Reductions in diabetes risk have also been observed during periods of fasting. For instance, intermittent fasting has been shown to lower blood glucose, insulin, and improve insulin sensitivity in people with obesity and pre-diabetes. Reduction in risk for heart disease and diabetes can be attributed to weight loss associated with intermittent fasting.

More recently, it’s been shown that intermittent fasting may help slow aging and extend lifespan. In a very recent study conducted at Harvard University, fasting was shown to help keep certain cell components in a “youthful” state, which may in turn improve life expectancy.

More and more scientific evidence shows that fasting is a great way to lower chronic disease risk, slow aging, and achieve a healthy body weight.

The Benefits of Intermittent Fasting

  • Fasting simplifies our day by reducing the number of meals you have to prepare.
  • Intermittent fasting helps to live longer. Scientists have known for a long time that restricting calories can lengthen life. Intermittent fasting activates many of the same mechanisms for extending life as calorie restriction.
  • Intermittent fasting may reduce the risk of cancer. A small amount of medical research has indicated that fasting might be helpful in the fight against cancer.
  • Fasting can help to get lean. Fasting puts body in a fat burning state that is rarely reach while following a normal eating schedule.
  • Intermittent fasting is much easier than traditional diets. The reason most diets fail is because we don’t follow the diet over the long term. Fasting is a weight loss method that is remarkably easy to stick to long-term.
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  • Aids weight loss.
  • Protects heart health.
  • Improve insulin sensitivity.
  • Protects brain functioning.
  • Inhibits cancer cell growth.
  • Reduce bad cholesterol
  • Reduce aging process
  • Improves metabolism
  • Promotes longitivity
  • Reduces inflammation
  • Improves neurodegenerative diseases
  • Normalizes blood pressure
  • Promotes fat loss.
  • Improves cellular regeneration and repair.
  • Improves lipid parameters
  • Reduces inflammation.
  • Improves allergies.

 Safety and Side Effects

Hunger is the main side effect of intermittent fasting. One may also feel weak and our brain may not perform as well as you’re used to. This may only be temporary, as it can take some time for our body to adapt to the new meal schedule. If we have a medical condition, we should consult with the doctor before trying intermittent fasting. Intermittent fasting has an outstanding safety profile. There is nothing dangerous about not eating for a while if one is healthy and well-nourished overall.

Safety should be taken if someone have these problems:

  • Have diabetes.
  • Have problems with blood sugar regulation.
  • Have low blood pressure.
  • Take medications.
  • Are underweight.
  • Have a history of eating disorders.
  • A woman who is trying to conceive.
  • A woman with a history of amenorrhea.
  • A woman who is pregnant or breastfeeding.

People with type 1 diabetes or women who are pregnant or nursing should not try these diets. Moreover, children are not advised to try fasting as it may impede their growth. Keep in mind that intermittent fasting is just one option for weight loss. While some people may find fasting easier to stick to than daily calorie restriction, others may not. All in all, people should choose a diet that they can easily incorporate into their lifestyle and stick to long-term.

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Overall, there is quite a lot of contrasting findings in relation to intermittent fasting, but the one common message is that more evidence is needed to examine the effects of this method; in particular longer-term human studies. However, current research indicates that intermittent fasting can be an effective method to promote weight loss, so this may be worth considering for some individuals, while weighing up the pros and cons of intermittent fasting as discussed in this article.

COMMON ARGUMENTS FOR FASTING DIETS

  • Our ancestors would have had periods of fasting depending on food availability.
  • Some people prefer an ‘all or nothing’ approach when trying to restrict calories for weight loss compared to a ‘moderation’ approach.
  • Promoters of intermittent fasting report a host of long-term health benefits, such as increased longevity, improved metabolic health, improved weight loss and a reduction in diseases, e.g. heart disease and Type 2 diabetes.

COMMON ARGUMENTS AGAINST FASTING DIETS

  • May lead to tiredness, headaches, lack of concentration and poor mood.
  • May be dangerous if unsupervised by a medical professional depending on the person’s age, medical history and lifestyle.
  • Not a very balanced approach, potential to interfere with metabolic rate.
  • An overall lack of evidence and no significant differences in outcomes found between more moderate daily restriction and this extreme fasting approach.
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Frequently Asked Questions

Here are answers to the most common questions about intermittent fasting.

Can I Drink Liquids during the Fast?

Yes. Water, Coffee, tea and other non-caloric beverages are fine. Do not add sugar to your coffee. Small amounts of milk or cream may be okay. Coffee can be particularly beneficial during a fast, as it can blunt hunger.

Isn’t It Unhealthy to Skip Breakfast?

No. The problem is that most stereotypical breakfast skippers have unhealthy lifestyles. If you make sure to eat healthy food for the rest of the day then the practice is perfectly healthy.

Can I Take Supplements While Fasting?

Yes. However, keep in mind that some supplements like fat-soluble vitamins may work better when taken with meals.

Can I Work out while Fasted?

Yes, fasted workouts are fine. Some people recommend taking branched chain amino acids  (BCAAs) before a fasted workout.

Will Fasting Cause Muscle Loss?

All weight loss methods can cause muscle loss, which is why it’s important to lift weights and keep your protein intake high. One study showed that intermittent fasting causes less muscle loss than regular calorie restriction.

Should Kids Fast?

Allowing child to fast is probably a bad idea.

Winter Water Melon/ Ash gourd Juice

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Winter Water Melon/ Ash gourd Juice

  • Author: Banhishikha Roy
  • Prep Time: 5 mins
  • Total Time: 5 mins
  • Yield: 1 1x
  • Category: Juice
  • Cuisine: Indian

Description

Ash gourd is commonly considered a vegetable, which is used in cooking a variety of staple Indian dishes such as kootu, curry, sabzi and dal, besides sweets and candies called petha. The therapeutic and remedial traits offered by the vegetable, as well as ash gourd seeds and leaves are extensive. Ash gourd supplies plenty of nutrition, being inherently high on water content providing a cooling effect on the body, having zero cholesterol thereby augmenting heart health and abounding in a plethora of vitamins and minerals to facilitate key metabolic functions in the body. Ash Gourd may help improve digestion and help to lose weight effectively. It also a rich source of soluble fiber, which decreases the digestion process and makes you feel fuller for a longer period of time. Moreover, the roots and juice of ash gourd also have applications in skin and hair care.

This remarkable natural wonder, which belongs to the cucumber and squash family, like snake gourd, also provides valuable curative properties for conditions such as fever, jaundice and diabetes. This is owing to its noteworthy antioxidant and anti-inflammatory qualities, due to the presence of beneficial plant compounds like flavonoids and carotenoids. In addition, the juice of ash gourd also heals hair and scalp disorders like dandruff and bald patches.


Scale

Ingredients

  • Ash gourd – 200 g
  • Lemon 34 drops
  • Rock salt – ¼ tsp
  • Roasted jeera powder/ Black pepper powder – ¼ tsp
  • Water- as required

Instructions

  1. Cut, peel and chop the ash gourd.
  2. Add ash gourd with water as required in a mixer/ juicer and blend to a smooth puree.
  3. Strain the puree.
  4. Add lemon juice, salt and roasted jeera powder/ black pepper powder


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 35 kcal
  • Sodium: 1.54 mg
  • Fat: 0.30 g
  • Carbohydrates: 5.70 g
  • Fiber: 6.75 g
  • Protein: 1.60 g

Keywords: Ash gourd juice/ Winter melon juice

“Seeds”: Powerhouse of Nutrients

Choose the Correct Seeds for You

Seeds are small mighty kernels which are known to be super-nutritious. They are also known as a powerhouse of nutrients and can be consumed daily for a myriad list of health benefits. Seeds contain all the starting materials necessary to develop into complex plants. Because of this, they are extremely nutritious. Seeds contain an ample amount of fibre, healthy monounsaturated fats, polyunsaturated fats, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants present in them, seeds are known to be extremely versatile and can be incorporated any way in any recipes. With growing awareness, several people are opting to consume these seeds for better health. When consumed as part of a healthy diet, seeds can help reduce blood sugar, cholesterol and blood pressure. They can help you to lose weight while providing you with enough energy for the whole day.

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Do you need more Energy but wants to lose weight? Do you want to Stay Healthy?  Follow this Article for that!

This article will describe the nutritional content and health benefits of the healthiest seeds you can eat.

Let’s have a look at some of the available Seeds which provide potential health benefits.

Note – These Seeds need to be incorporated into a well balanced healthy diet in combination with lifestyle changes for them to work optimally.

Chia seeds

The chia seed has stolen the limelight lately on the supermarket red carpet, showing up in everything from energy bars to cereals to beverages. Chia comes from a desert plant in Mexico called Salvia hispanica and is packed with omega-3 fatty acids, carbohydrates, protein, dietary fiber, antioxidants, and calcium. These tiny black and white seeds were used long ago by Mayan and Aztec cultures to boost energy. Chia seeds contain five times more calcium than milk, seven times more Vitamin C than oranges, three times more iron than spinach, twice the potassium content in Banana and eight times more Omega 3 than Salmon.

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Health Benefits of Chia Seeds

High quality protein, Boost Energy and Stamina, Controls hunger, Fights cervical and breast cancer, Good for heart Health, Helps to treat Diabetes, Cleanses Colon, High in antioxidant, Helps to digest, Controls Hypertension, Builds muscle and aids weight loss, Arthritis, Gets rid of Toxins, Reduce Inflammation, Promotes sound sleep, Hyperactivity disorder, Healthy skin, hair, nails.

 

Fenugreek Seeds

Trigonella foenum-graecum (L), commonly known as fenugreek is an annual herb belonging to the family Papilionaceae and is cultivated throughout the country. Fenugreek is native to Eastern Europe and parts of Asia but now widely cultivated almost all over the world for its leaves and seeds, which are commonly used as leafy vegetables and condiments, respectively. The leaves and seeds of the plant are widely used as spice in food preparations and as ingredient in traditional medicine. Fenugreek contains a specialized type of soluble fiber “Galactomannan” that slows the absorption of glucose in the intestine.

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Health Benefits of Fenugreek Seeds

It has various potential pharmacological effects in modern medicine such as Antidiabetic, Antilipidemic, Antioxidant, Hypocholesterolemic, Hepatoprotective, Antifungal, Anti-Inflammatory, Antibacterial, Anticarcinogenic, Antiulcer, Antilithigenic, Neuroprotective Effects, Cure Skin Inflammation and Scars, Lose weight by suppressing appetite, Remedy for fever and Aids Digestion  .

 

Fennel Seeds

Fennel is traditionally used for medicinal and culinary purposes. The entire plant is valuable in the medicinal industry; its enlarged base is used as a vegetable; its leaves are used for culinary purposes and its seeds as a spice and for essential oil extraction. Fennel is a versatile ingredient in cooking because it can be used as an herb, spice, or vegetable. The aromatic and flavorful herb comes with a rich array of nutrients including Vitamin A, B6, C and minerals like calcium, iron, zinc, manganese. Fennel is super high in dietary fiber, covering more than 25 percent of your daily value, as well as potassium, which is crucial in maintaining low blood pressure. Fennel seeds are store house of antioxidants and volatile oils.

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Health Benefits of Fennel Seeds

Diuretics and detoxifies blood, relieve haemorrhoids, Aromatic quality relaxes blood vessels, helps to get rid of intestinal worms, acts as a mouth freshener, anti-aging, prevents hair fall, antiseptic, anti-oxidant rich, prevents from eye disorders, reduce weight, relief from common cold and cough, promotes proper bowel movement, improves bone strength and development, relieves menstrual problem.

 

Flax Seeds

Flaxseeds have long been known to provide medicinal benefits. Rich in omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fiber, and lignans (beneficial plant compounds), recent studies show flaxseeds may help reduce belly fat and lower your risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes. Flaxseeds are widely available in products such as frozen waffles, cereals, and meatless meal products. Rich in antioxidants, Vitamins B, Magnesium, potassium, manganese, phosphorous, iron, copper, high in dietary fibre.

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Health Benefits of Flax Seeds

Flax seeds are also beneficial those who have problems with gas, it helps with eliminating gas. High in omega- 3, Potent anti-inflammatory, Fires up metabolism, Burns fat, aids in constipation, pulls debris out of the bowels, lowers cholesterol, lowers blood pressure, controls blood sugar, help to keep hunger at bay, which may aid weight control, rich in lignans which may reduce cancer, phytoestrogens that protect against cancer, anti-viral, anti-bacterial. Flaxseed oil, fibers and flax lignans have potential health benefits such as in reduction of cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes, cancer, arthritis, and osteoporosis, autoimmune and neurological disorders. Flax protein helps in the prevention and treatment of heart disease and in supporting the immune system.

 

Pumpkin Seeds

The pumpkin plant, along with its seeds, has been used in the traditional medicine of many countries, including India, Mexico, Canada, United States, China and Europe. Subtly sweet and nutty with a somewhat chewy texture, pumpkin seeds are lower in fat than other seeds and offer essential minerals like iron, zinc, magnesium, and potassium. Great source of Vitamin B, E and K. Pumpkin seeds also contain protective compounds called phytosterols, which likely contribute to their known prostate and heart health benefits. Pumpkin seeds are packed with L- tryptophan, the relaxing amino acids. The only seeds that is alkaline- forming. 100 g seeds provide 30 g of protein. Raw pumpkin seeds are essential. They are rich in antioxidants, anti- inflammatory properties and Omega 3 fatty acids.

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Health Benefits of Pumpkin Seeds

Raw pumpkin seeds are essential for skin health and wound healing. Pumpkin seeds promote good prostate health and offer anti-inflammatory and cholesterol lowering benefits. Reduce the levels of LDL cholesterol, Reduce inflammation for arthritis, Reduce blood pressure, Boots immunity, Maintain sugar level, Prevent kidney stone formation, good for prostate health, liver functioning, gallbladder, disabilities of leaning, inflammation, cancer management Promote good sleep, lowers depression, preventing kidney stone formation, natural protector against osteoporosis and inhibition of parasites are established.

 

Sunflower Seeds

This stadium favourite is a home run for nutritional benefits. Small but mighty, sunflower seeds are an excellent source of protein, iron, folate, zinc, dietary fiber, and vitamin E. In fact, sunflower seeds are the best whole-food source of vitamin E, a nutrient that may slow the effects of aging, boosts the immune system and an excellent source of Selenium, Magnesium and Zinc. Sunflower is cultivated globally for its oil and protein content predominantly. Proteins present in sunflower seeds have favourable amino acid distribution. Also in addition, tocopherols, minerals, and vitamins are provided by sunflower seeds in substantial amounts.

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Health Benefits of Sunflower Seeds

Gives relief from muscle cramp, reducing blood pressure and treating migraine, treating thyroid health, phytosterol which help in lowering blood cholesterol level, treating inflammatory conditions like Arthritis, improves bones, improves skin, Antioxidants, Assist nerves, Prevents anemia, assist heart health, eases arthritic pain, control cell damage, assist cancer prevention.

 

Sesame seeds

Sesame seeds aren’t just for hamburger buns. Popular in many Asian dishes, sesame seeds add a nutty taste and a delicate crunch to whatever you’re making. Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) seeds have been grown in tropical regions throughout the world since prehistoric times. Traditional Chinese Medicine shows the sesame oil is regarded as God’s gift. Sesame seeds were used by Egyptians as a medicine in early 1500 B.C.  Sesame seeds are a very good source of dietary proteins with fine quality amino acids that are essential for growth, especially in children. Just 100 g of seeds provide about 18 g of protein (32% of daily-recommended values). In addition, sesame seeds contain many health benefiting compounds such as sesamol (3, 4-methylene-dioxyphenol), sesaminol, furyl-methanthiol, guajacol (2-methoxyphenol), phenylethanthiol and furaneol, vinylguacol and decadienal. Sesamol and sesaminol are phenolic anti-oxidants. Together, these compounds help stave off harmful free radicals from the body. Sesame is amongst the seeds rich in quality vitamins and minerals. They are very good sources of B-complex vitamins such as niacin, folic acid, thiamin (vitamin B1), pyridoxine (vitamin B6), and riboflavin. These powerhouse seeds provide calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, B vitamins, and dietary fiber. They’re also used to make sesame paste or tahini, which can be spread on crackers or toast and often used in Middle Eastern dishes to make hummus and falafel.

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Health Benefits of Sesame Seeds

Promotes bone health and prevents Osteoporosis, Prevents tooth decay, halitosis, bleeding gums, dry throat, fight free radicals, prevent hangover, anticancer, anti- depressant, anti-inflammatory, lowers blood pressure, reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases and hypertension, reduces signs of premature aging and strength muscle, tissue and hair, Beneficial in protecting DNA from harmful effects of radiation caused by chemotherapy and radiopathy, facilitates digestion and prevents constipation, solution for anemia, good for oral health, lowers cholesterol, prevents wrinkles, good for eye health, improves respiratory health.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

How can we use these Seeds?

  • Seeds such as sunflower seeds or pumpkin kernels can be eaten as a snack by themselves, either raw or dry-fried.
  • Dry-fry seeds in a pan to bring out their flavour. Take them off the heat once they start to colour as they will continue cooking for a little while. When you dry-fry seeds, the heat will affect the oils, so it is advisable to heat only the amount you are going to use straight away. If kept, dry-fried seeds will quickly go rancid.
  • Use seeds as a garnish or mixed through salads to add texture and flavour.
  • Add seeds to muesli or other cereals.
  • Seeds can be used in breads and baking, either whole or ground.
  • Ground flaxseeds (also called linseeds) or chia seeds can be added to smoothies to add fibre, texture and flavour.

How to eat seeds? How it will be more effective?

Seeds represent life. Many seeds are edible and should be eaten raw. When exposed to heat, they often produce toxic substances and vitamins, minerals and essential oil profiles are denatured. By roasting the seed, its classification ranges from live food to dead food. There is no seed on the ground that can withstand roasting or heat treatment without destroying its nutritional components. Always remember – we should eat the seeds in their natural form, ie raw. Of course, we can add them to other foods, but we should avoid those roasted or dipped in chocolate and the like.

How Food&wellness will help you?

For proper guidance and result you should join the programme of Food & Wellness. This program gives you a personalized diet plan that includes the kinds and amounts of seeds that you need to eat to have a healthy lifestyle. Food & Wellness will always guide regarding every issue you face and it will be taken care of by our Dietitians.

Chicken sausage salad

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Chicken sausage salad

  • Author: Meenu Agarwal
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Category: Appetiser
  • Method: Sauteeing
  • Cuisine: Indian
  • Diet: Low Calorie

Description

This chicken sausage salad is quick, healthy and affordable! This salad is sure to fill you up without weighing you down.


Ingredients

– 3 chicken sausages
– 3 baby corns
– 3-4 tsp mushrooms 1lemon juice
– ¼ green capsicum & ¼ yellow capsicum
– ½ tomato

FOR DRESSING
– 3 tbsp. olive oil
– 1 tbsp. vinegar
– salt as per taste

– ¼tsp black pepper
– 1/4 tsp powdered sugar

– ½tsp mustard
– 1 tsp chopped parsley
– 1-2 flakes garlic – crushed & chopped


Instructions

1. Heat ½ tsp oil in a nonstick pan. Sauté sausages for 1-2 minutes till light golden. Remove from heat. Cut diagonally into slices or keep it longitudinal.
2.Deseed capsicums
3. Boil 2 cups water with ½ tsp salt
4. Pat dry vegetables on a clean kitchen towel. Slice baby corns diagonally, cut each mushroom into 4 pcs.
5. Mix sausages, mushrooms, baby corns, capsicums
6. Mix all the ingredients of the dressing with a whisk, till it gets thick
7. Pour the dressing over the salad mixture in the bowl. Mix well



Nutrition

  • Serving Size: Serves 2
  • Calories: 220kcal
  • Fat: 18g
  • Carbohydrates: 90g
  • Protein: 25g

Baked yogurt bread rolls

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Baked yogurt bread rolls

  • Author: Meenu Agarwal
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Cuisine: Indian
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Description

These easy baked yoghurt bread rolls are light and delicious. These can be a part of your weekend breakfast or even dinner options apart from being served as an evening snack option.


Scale

Ingredients

-2 slices bread fresh
-1 tsp mustard sauce – to spread
– 1 tbsp. – toned milk
-1/2tsp carom seeds (Ajwain)

FILLING
– 1 tbsp. hung curd
– 1 tbsp. finely chopped red bell peppers deseeded or deseeded chopped tomato
– 1/2 cup finely chopped broccoli
– 1 tbsp. peas
– ½ green chili – deseeded & chopped
– 1/2tsp salt and black pepper
– 1/4tsp red chili flakes


Instructions

1) Boil 1 cup water with ½ tsp salt
2) Mash peas with the hands.
3) Put the hung curd in a bowl. Add all other ingredients of the filling to the curd.
4) Cut the sides of slice, keep it flat on a rolling board. Press, applying gentle pressure with a rolling pin so that holes of the bread close.
5) Spread ½ tsp mustard on the slice.
6) Spread a layer of filling. Roll carefully. Seal end by applying some curd. Press well.
7) Brush milk on roll. Spread some carom seeds on a plate
8) At serving time, cover a wire rack of oven with foil. Grease foil lightly. Place the rolls. Grill for about 5 minutes till edges turn little golden. Serve immediately.



Nutrition

  • Serving Size: Serves 2
  • Calories: 235kcal
  • Fat: 8g
  • Carbohydrates: 90g
  • Protein: 20g

Sautéed vegetables

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Sautéed vegetables

  • Author: Meenu Agarwal
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 25 minutes
  • Category: Side dish
  • Diet: Low Calorie

Description

Here’s how to make one of the best and tastiest sauteed vegetables which are flavour packed, crisp and colourful! This rainbow coloured recipe is also enhanced with vegan protein such as the Tofu or one can even add any other source of protein like Paneer to enhance the nutritive value as well as the taste.


Ingredients


Instructions

  1.  Heat oil in a frying pan.
  2.  Add garlic and chili, sauté. Add broccoli, french beans, corn and again sauté for 2-3 minutes.
  3.  Add Tofu or cottage cheese and sauté for another 1-2minutes.
  4.  Add salt, freshly crushed black pepper and oregano.
  5. Sprinkle roasted sesame seeds on top.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 2
  • Calories: 241Kcal
  • Fat: 6g
  • Carbohydrates: 36g
  • Protein: 15.5g

Ragi Dosa / Pancake Recipe

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Ragi Dosa / Pancake Recipe

  • Author: Mubarra
  • Prep Time: 15-20 Minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 Minutes
  • Total Time: 28 minute
  • Cuisine: Indian
  • Diet: Diabetic

Description

Ragi Dosa/Cheela/Pancake is a healthy and delicious breakfast recipe from South India which is made from Ragi (Finger Millet) flour. It is also known by the name of Nachni in Maharashtra, Mandua in Hindi, Ragulu in Telugu and Kezhvargu in Tamil. It is a nutrient dense grain and is referred to as a local superfood since it is a great source of calcium, iron and essential amino acids. This instant Ragi Dosa recipe is quick to make and can be served as a breakfast, lunch or even a dinner meal with homemade chutneys/ salsa/ pickle/ raita/ curd/ vegetable sabzi or curries.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 40 g Ragi flour or sprouted ragi flour
  • 1 tablespoon (10-15g) of Besan flour (gram flour)
  • 2 teaspoons of finely chopped Onions
  • ¼ teaspoon finely chopped Ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon green chilli chopped
  • 34 curry leaves chopped
  • 1 tablespoon chopped coriander leaves (cilantro)
  • ¼  teaspoon cumin seeds
  • A pinch of asafoetida (optional)
  • ¼  cup buttermilk or 2 teaspoons of curd (yogurt) mixed in some water
  • ¼  cup of water or add as required
  • Salt as required
  • 1 tsp of Oil or Ghee

Instructions

  1. Add ragi flour and besan (gram flour) to a mixing bowl.
  2. Add finely chopped onions, curry leaves, ginger, green chillies, coriander leaves, asafoetida, cumin seeds, and salt as per taste.
  3. Then add buttermilk or curd and water to the mixing bowl.
  4. Mix very well to a thin batter of pouring consistency.
  5. Cover and let this batter rest aside for 15 to 20 minutes.

Cooking Ragi Dosa

  1. For cooking the Ragi Dosa, heat a non stick tawa/skillet/pan on medium flame. Grease the pan well and wipe off any excess oil with a tissue. Make sure to mix the batter well before pouring.
  2. When the pan is hot enough, pour the batter thin across the pan as you would do for a Rava dosa/Pancake
  3. Then, gently spread the batter with the ladle.
  4. Pour a teaspoon of oil on the top and sides of the dosa and let the base cook and become crisp until the sides begin to get separated from the pan.
  5. Flip over and cook the other side as well. Cook till both the sides are crisp.
  6. Serve ragi dosa or pancake hot  with any chutney/pickle/curry.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 226.6 Kcal
  • Fat: 5.72 g
  • Carbohydrates: 36.01 g
  • Protein: 5.61 g

Keywords: Diabetic Diet, vegetarian, Healthy, Weightloss

Minestrone Soup

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Minestrone Soup

  • Author: Banhishikha
  • Prep Time: 10 Minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 - 40 Minutes
  • Total Time: 40 - 50 Minutes
  • Yield: 4 1x

Description

Minestrone soup is a thick Italian soup, made with vegetables, addition of pasta, noodles or rice. Common ingredients include beans, onions, celery, carrots and tomatoes. The food is a traditional dish in Italy. Milestrone soup was traditionally made to use up leftover vegetables, so feel free to use any seasonal vegetables and greens. It can be used as detoxification and also helps to stimulate the purification of the liver and the entire body and a good source of multiple Vitamins and Minerals. Essentially, minestrone is a thick, hearty variety of vegetable soup. There is no set recipe for minestrone, since it can be usually made out of whatever vegetables are at one’s disposal. it can be vegetarian, contain meat, or contain an animal bone based stock (such as chicken stock)

Minestrone soup is a healthy and quick to make nutritious recipe, can be consumed in breakfast, lunch, dinner or as a snack item. always try to serve hot to enjoy the taste.


Scale

Ingredients

  • Onion 30 gm
  • Carrot – 50 gm
  • French Beans – 40 gm
  • Celery – 20 gm
  • Salt – 0.5 tsp
  • Freshly grounded
  • Black pepper – 0.5 tsp
  • Small macaroni – 100 gm
  • Kidney beans – 50 gm
  • Tomato – 100 gm
  • Garlic- 8 cloves
  • Oil – 20 ml

Instructions

  1. Chop onion, garlic, carrot, French beans, celery and tomatoes.
  2. Heat oil in a pan.
  3. Add the chopped onions, garlic, carrot, French beans and celery over a medium flame and cook until the vegetables soften and stir occasionally.
  4. Add vegetable stock, salt, pepper and bring it to boil and cook about for 10 minutes.
  5. Add tomatoes and macaroni and peas; simmer for 15 to 20 minutes more.
  6. Taste for seasoning and adjust to taste.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 90 - 92 kcal
  • Fat: 5 - 6 gm
  • Carbohydrates: 10 - 12 gm
  • Protein: 15 - 16 gm

Keywords: #HEALTHYSOUP

Moong Dal Cheela/Pancake Recipe

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Moong Dal Cheela/Pancake Recipe

  • Author: Mubarra
  • Prep Time: 5 - 10 Minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 Minutes
  • Total Time: 12 minute
  • Category: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snack
  • Cuisine: Indian
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Description

Moong dal Cheela/Pancake is a healthy, delicious and quick to make recipe that can be consumed as a breakfast or snack item. It can be made with minimal ingredients and within minutes given, that the Moong dal is soaked overnight or for few hours before preparation. It can be served without any sides but it tastes best when served with homemade chutneys/pickle/curd/raita.

 


Scale

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup Moong Dal (whole or split with husk) 
  • 1 tablespoon Green Peas
  • 1 tablespoon Water
  • 2 teaspoons of finely chopped Onion
  • 1/4 teaspoon of finely chopped Ginger 
  • 1/4 teaspoon of finely chopped  Coriander leaves 
  • Salt to taste
  • 1/4  teaspoon of finely chopped Green Chili 
  • 1  teaspoon ghee or Oil

Instructions

  • Wash and soak the moong dal for around 3-4 hours prior to making the batter.
  • Then take the soaked and drained moong dal, blend it in a mixer along with green chillies, green peas, ginger, using little water to make a thick paste.
  • In a bowl, add onion, coriander leaves, salt and the blended moong dal and peas paste.
  • Mix well and add water to make a thin dosa like batter. Remember to add water in small batches to get your desired consistency (Medium thick consistency)
  • Heat a large nonstick frying pan on medium-high heat. Add a little oil to coat the pan.
  • Pour a ladle full of batter when the pan is hot and flatten out until 1cm thick. 
  • Pour a little oil on either side and cook until golden brown.
  • Flip and cook on the other side. 
  • Serve hot with any Chutney/Pickle/Salsa/Curry

Notes

The Moong dal Cheela/Pancake can be stuffed with or topped with vegetables of your choice to make it more nutritionally balanced.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 167.75 Kcal
  • Fat: 5.325 g
  • Carbohydrates: 21.11 g
  • Protein: 8.79 g

Keywords: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snack, healthy, vegetarian, Protein, weightloss

Mixed Vegetables preparation

 

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Mixed Vegetables preparation


Description

This mixed vegetables preparation with added Paneer is not only easy to prepare, but also has the goodness of vegetables and different flavours from the spices used which makes it an overall delectable nutritious dish.


Ingredients

Onion (freshly chopped) – 1 medium

Mushrooms – 6 – 8 (sliced)

French beans – 4 – 6 (chopped)

Green capsicum – ¼ (chopped)

Yellow bell pepper – ¼ (chopped)

Tomato (deseeded) – ¼ (chopped)

Cauliflower florets – 2-3

Paneer – 100 gms

Carrot – ½ (chopped)

Green peas (boiled) – ½ cup

Salt – to taste

Turmeric powder – ½ tsp

Red chili powder – 1 tsp

Coriander powder – 1 tsp

Garam Masala – ½ tsp

Tandoori Masala – 1 tsp

Ginger Garlic paste – 1 tsp


Instructions

1) Take a heavy bottomed kadhai. Add oil and heat it. Add cumin seeds and sauté for a minute.

2) Add chopped onions and stir well. Sauté till transparent. Add salt and mix well.

3) Add all the above listed chopped vegetables to the sautéed onion and cover it with a lid. Cook for 4-5 minutes on low medium heat stirring occasionally.

4) Add boiled peas and mix well. Cover and cook for another 5 minutes.

5) Add seasonings: Turmeric powder, salt, red chili powder, coriander powder, garam masala, tandoori masala. Mix well.

6) Add chopped deseeded tomato to the pan and mix it well. Cover and cook on low medium heat.

7) Add paneer cubes to the vegetables and mix well. Cover and cook on low medium heat.

8) Add freshly chopped coriander leaves on top. Serve hot and garnish with chopped ginger on the top.



Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 2
  • Calories: 65 - 75 KCAL
  • Fat: 5 - 7 GM
  • Carbohydrates: 15 - 20 GM
  • Protein: 4 - 6 GM

 

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