Chenna

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Chhena

  • Author: Banhishikha
  • Cook Time: 15 Minutes
  • Total Time: 15 Minutes
  • Yield: 350 gm

Description

Chhena are cheese curds from the Indian subcontinent, made from buffalo or cow milk by adding food acids such as lemon juice and calcium lactate. Chhena is pressed and further processed to make paneer and also used to make desserts such as Khira Sagara, Chhena Kheer, Rasa malai as well as sweets such as Chhena jalebi, Chhena gaja, Pantua, Rasgulla and Sandesh.

Chhena is an incredible source of healthy fat calories with protein, calcium which helps to have a healthy strong bones, Vitamin B2, Vitamin B1 which protects nerves, helps in carbohydrate  metabolism, prevents heart heart diseases and helps to produce red blood cells. this is ideal to consume during breakfast or snack time.


Ingredients

  • Milk – 1 litre
  • Lemon Juice – 15 – 20 ml

Instructions

  1. Bring milk to boil in a saucepan.
  2. Add lime juice. Keep on stirring and until milk gets curdled.
  3. Ideally the milk should get curdled at once after you stir lime juice or vinegar. Just keep extra lime juice ready, in case milk does not curdle.
  4. When the greenish liquid (whey) separates from the milk, pour the curdled milk into pan with the help of a sieve or muslin cloth.
  5. Usually from 1 litre of whole fat milk, yield 350 gram of chhenna.

Notes

Instead of lemon juice you can also use 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of vinegar or 3 tablespoons (45 g) of Curd or 1 tsp of Citric Acid powder (5 g) .

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 4
  • Calories: 468 - 470 kcal
  • Fat: 14 - 15 gm
  • Carbohydrates: 48 - 50 gm
  • Protein: 16 -18 gm

Keywords: #HEALTHY

Stir Fry Vegetables

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Stir Fry Vegetables

  • Author: Meenu Agarwal
  • Prep Time: 10
  • Cook Time: 10 mins
  • Total Time: 20 mins

Description

Stir frying is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a small amount of very hot oil while being stirred or tossed in a wok. This vegetable stir fry is a blend of colorful veggies which are rich in micronutrients. An easy side dish or main course that’s light, fresh and totally delicious. Stir fry veggies are very healthy and a great way to get in your nutrients. This mix of vegetables is low calorie and contains plenty of vitamins and minerals including Vitamin K, potassium, Vitamin C, folic acid, beta-carotene and antioxidants.


Ingredients

  • Vegetables of your choice – 1 serving
  • Vegetable Oil – ½-1 tsp
  • Salt – to taste
  • Black pepper – to taste
  • Ginger – Garlic paste
  • Oyster sauce – 1 tsp
  • Lemon juice – 1 tsp

Instructions

  1. Heat the vegetable oil in a wok.
  2. Add the ginger, garlic, broccoli, capsicums, and veggies of your choice and stir fry for 2-3 minutes.
  3. Stir in the vegetable oil and oyster sauce and heat through and mix all the ingredients.
  4. Serve immediately.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 180 - 200 KCAL
  • Fat: 12 - 15 GM
  • Carbohydrates: 45 - 50 GM
  • Protein: 18 - 20 GM

Limit the consumption of these 4 unhealthy snacks!

Junk food is defined as “any food, which is low in essential nutrients and high in everything else – calories and sodium”. Junk foods contain little or no proteins, vitamins or minerals but are rich in salt, sugar, fats and are high in energy (calories). Junk food is popular because it is tasty; but it is unhealthy. It is low in fiber, high in fat, and sugar in liquid form. Studies have shown that despite being unhealthy, junk food induces gorging that leads to obesity. Below, we focus on 4 unhealthy though popular snacks.

 1)   Papad

Both North and South Indian lunches and dinners are incomplete without the all-time favourite Papads. Rice, dal, sabji, aachar along with papad is a must in our homes. And, if papad not there, it can be a cause for much displeasure.

The recipe for making papad is handed down over generations. Rice, flour, lentils, potatoes, chickpeas or black gram and various spices, salt and peanut oil are ground together to prepare a smooth dough. This dough is then spread in round flat thin breads and sun dried. Some of us have seen our grandmoms and moms spending afternoons making papads. In some places, it is a family event with all the aunts coming over to make them.

Papads are served either fried or roasted. They are okay for occasional consumption, but not for excessive or even regular indulgence. Papad has a large amount of salt which acts as a preservative and also makes the papad tasty. However, too much salt (sodium) in our body leads to high blood pressure, water retention, abdominal bloating, increased thirst, diabetes, etc. Some of our papad varieties have liberal servings of spices. Excess of spices is also not good.

We typically consume at least 2-3 pieces of papad in one sitting and immediately feel acidic with unpleasant burps and sensation of indigestion. When consumed in excess, papads may stick to the intestinal lining and can lead to constipation and gastric issues.

Fried Papad v/s Roasted Papad?

Fried papads cooked in the same oil repeatedly which is rich in trans fat. Trans fat is extremely dangerous and will lead to increase in levels of bad cholesterol in the body causing heart problem, diabetes etc. While roasted papads are better than fried papads, daily roasted papad intake is not recommended, as it’s very acidic and has high sodium content.

I am not trying to scare you all but if you care about your body then be considerate and controlled in your consumption of papads.

 2)    Samosa

A medium to large size samosa gives us 250 – 310 calories and is loaded with carbs and fats. The cooking oil in which it’s cooked is the main culprit. Road side stalls use the same oil to fry multiple times making the oil stale. Most of the time, hydrogenated oils (contain trans fats) are used to fry samosas. Trans fats are generated when liquid oils are turned into solid or semi-solid fats through hydrogenation, a process by which hydrogen is added to vegetable oil. This happens when oil is recycled during cooking, or when food is heated over and over again in the same oil it was cooked in. Hydrogenation increases shelf life and improves taste making samosas tastier and crispier. Samosas are very fattening. Cholesterol, digestion issues, trans fats, refined flour are good reasons to think before you snack on samosas.

Home made samosas or Frozen samosas?

Homemade samosas are relatively better than street samosas if we don’t re-use oil and if we use healthier fillings as compared to street fillings.

Frozen samosas are pre-fried and again needed to be fried at home, so not much better.

Snack on something healthier, other than samosas. Burning 300 calories will require you to walk an average of approx. 6 km.  Samosa or Health – the choice is yours.

 3)    Bhujia

Bhujia is one of the most popular junk food that we consume. Almost every Indian household has 1-2 packets of bhujia (can be any variant) in their monthly grocery list and bhujias occupy a permanent space on the dining table. For every holiday travel, a variety of bhujias is a must pack. But how many times do we really look at the nutritional content of each servings of the bhujia. One serving is typical 10 grams and the minimum intake in one sitting is 3-8 spoons (30 gms to 80 grams). Nutritional content of 100 gms of Aloo Bhujia is Energy – 630 kcal, Protein – 5 g, Total Carbohydrate – 40 g, Total Fat – 50 g, 6Trans Fats – 0 g. Cholesterol – 0 mg, Sodium – 670 mg. Calorie break down 71 % fat, 25 % Carbohydrate and 3 % Protein. Most of the bhujias are deep fried and also use preservatives to increase the shelf life.

Taking bhujias for a prolonged period can lead to high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

4)    Mysore Pak

Flying out of Chennai on some occasions, I have seen lots of fresh packs of Mysore Pak being bought from Krishna Sweets. Growing up in old Calcutta (now Kolkata), the sweet is new for me. We grew up only on the traditional chhanar rosogollas and sandesh. Having tasted the Mysore Pak, it is a delicious sweet which melts into the mouth. Aha…! Mysore Pak is one of the most popular sweets in South India, and is prepared using large amounts of ghee, vegetable oil, sugar, water and besan (gram flour). On an average the serving size of 50g gives around 200 calories with about 100 calories coming from fat. The sweet provides generous amounts of saturated fat and sugar. From a health point of view, regular consumption is not recommended with occasional treat advisable for the sweet cravings.

Before, you pop 2-3 pieces, imagine the amount of work you would need to do to burn those extra calories.

What are some healthy snack options that you can have

  • Murmura or puffed rice (jhaal muri from Bengal),
  • Nuts like almonds and peanuts
  • Talmakhana (lotus seeds) – roasted and unsweetened
  • Sprouts salads
  • Fresh cut vegetables with hummus or guacamole
  • Fresh cut fruits
  • Poha

 So next time THINK before you polish the papad, samosas, bhujias and mysore pak in the evenings, when you are hungry or with your liquor. LIMIT the frequency and the quantity. Your health is in your hands.

 

What is the definition of a healthy diet?

Pretty Simple – Mix of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats, plus enough vitamins and minerals for optimal health. Science says that some of the food choices within these categories are better than others.

Are there foods you never should eat? Nothing really. If you crave an ice cream sundae occasionally, have a small one. But don’t make it a daily event. Set off the samosas at parties with healthier snacks at home. Healthy eating making right food choice most of the time.

Nutrition scientists have compiled the following list of foods you should keep to a minimum. Research suggests that eating these foods regularly can create the onset of life-threatening illnesses such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and even some cancers.

Photo credit: Robin Stickel from Pexels

White carbohydrates. Bread, pasta, rice, cookies, cake — are best had in the whole-grain versions.
Added sugar. Irrespective of Whether it’s white granulated sugar, brown sugar, high- fructose corn syrup, corn sugar, or honey, sugar contains almost no nutrients and is pure carbohydrate. When we are eating a lot of sugar you are filling up on empty calories, causing our blood sugar to rise and fall like a roller coaster.

Research has proven that soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages are the primary source of added sugar in all our diets and a major contributor to weight gain.

Dairy fat. Ice cream, whole milk, and cheese are full of saturated fat and some naturally occurring trans-fat and therefore can increase the risk of the health problems, notably heart disease. The healthiest milk and milk products are low-fat versions, such as skim milk, milk with 1% fat and reduced-fat cheeses.

Baked sweets. Cookies, snack cakes, doughnuts, pastries, and many other treats are so tempting and we can’t but hog on them, but these commercially prepared versions are packed with processed carbohydrates, added sugar, unhealthy fats, and salt.

Dietary guidelines and the American Heart Association recommend reducing sodium to 1,500 mg per day and not exceeding 2,300 mg per day. But most of us get 1½ teaspoons (or 8,500 mg) of salt daily. That translates to about 3,400 mg of daily sodium. Our body needs a certain amount of sodium, but too much can increase blood pressure and the risk of heart disease and stroke.

Time to understand the complications of belly fat, stubborn tummies and pot bellies.

Are you struggling with Round or stubborn tummies. It’s time to take measures to reduce it or else risk metabolic complications, increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes. In women, it is also associated with breast cancer and the need for gallbladder surgery. Belly fat lies deep inside the abdomen and is very stubborn in nature having been deposited for a long period of time.

Just do the simple measurement of your waistline and find out where you are. The higher the number, the greater the danger your tummy poses to your health.
• For women, a waist measurement of 35 inches or more is cause for concern.
• For men, a waist measurement of 40 inches or more could spell trouble.

The researchers say that normal-weight adults with central obesity are at two times the risk of dying earlier than individuals who are either obese or overweight. Based on the study results, the researchers have stressed the importance of adopting an active lifestyle and eating the right diet to prevent fat from accumulating around the belly.

Abdominal fats or stubborn tummies can be controlled through a mix of moderate exercise and proper dietary control. Daily physical activity of 30 to 60 minutes is a must along with correct diet. As a thumb rule, reduce fruit juice and carbonated drinks, take in complex carbs, green vegetables and reduce sugar in take.

Food n Wellness, provides wellness solutions for managing the problem with correct diet prescription and exercise routines tailor made for you. It’s time to be conscious and start taking measures to control our body or else the doctor takes charge of our bodies.

When do we consult a Nutritionist & Dietitian

You’re overweight but healthy.

If you’re technically overweight, but your physician says you’re healthy, the question is: How do you feel about yourself? If you’re happy with the way you look and feel, then don’t call a dietitian. But if you’re not happy with your image in the mirror, consider calling someone who can help you lose weight in a healthy manner.

You’re underweight and want to gain weight.

Gaining weight in a healthy manner can be difficult, and You don’t want to simply load up on bad fats, sugars and empty calories. If you don’t know how to gain weight in a healthy way, consider seeing a dietitian. She can show you how to incorporate healthy fats and nutrient-dense, high-quality foods to encourage healthy weight gain that will keep you energized.

Want to lose weight in a healthy manner.

There are plethora of weight loss tools available on the internet and some fad diets like low carb etc etc to get to optimum weight. If the above have not worked for you, its time to see a dietitian to help you reach your goals with a customized plan.

You’re working out, but not seeing results.

A lot of men/ women work out every day but don’t know how to fuel their bodies properly, which means they won’t see optimal results, like weight loss or increased muscle tone. If you’re not seeing results from exercise and you’re eating healthily, call a dietitian/nutritionist to find out what you’re missing in your diet.

Recently been diagnosed with a food allergy, sensitivity or other related medical condition.

Most doctors don’t give enough nutritional information to show you how to live a full life with a newly diagnosed food allergy or sensitivity. Gluten sensitivities, celiac disease, diabetes, high cholesterol or lactose intolerance, thyroid disorder are very common. A dietitian/nutritionist can show you how to incorporate new foods and substitutes into your lifestyle so you can be healthy and eat well, even within a restricted diet.

You’re pregnant.

If you’re pregnant and feel like you don’t have a good sense about how to eat well or properly nourish yourself, consider seeing a dietitian. If you gain too much weight during pregnancy, you’re at risk for developing gestational diabetes and high blood pressure, which can be dangerous. Many women feel like pregnancy is an excuse to go to town and eat loads of junk, but trust me, If you gain 20-30 kilos instead of 10-15, it will be even more of a struggle to lose that weight after the baby is born.

You’re having fertility issues.

If you’re not in optimal health, it could affect your fertility. If you don’t feel healthy or eat well, and you’re experiencing difficulty getting pregnant, consider calling a dietitian to learn how to better nourish yourself.

image sourse: health.com

Healthy vs Fad Diets

image sourse: health.com

image source: health.com

Good Health comes with a healthy weight, neither too more nor too less. The Key to healthy weight is what we eat and how much we eat along with moderate to high exercise.In recent years, there has been a proliferation of fad diets which are sold as low fat diets and the best way to lose weight. Enough research evidence exists that low fat diets don’t work as these replace fat with easily digested carbs.They try to restrict select nutrients from our daily intake, which results in short term weight loss which ultimately leads to nutrient deficiency .

Hundreds of diets have been created, many promising fast and permanent weight loss. Remember the Atkins diet? The grapefruit diet? 3 day water diet? Low carb.. Blood type diet.. and various celebrity diets?
Fact is that any diet will work which gives us fewer calories than what we intake.
The best diet for losing weight is one that is good for all parts of your body, from your brain to your toes, and not just for our waistline. It should also be one which we can manage for a longer period of time without too much issues. Ideally a good diet plan is one that offers plenty of good to taste and healthy choices, excludes only few foods, and is easy on wallet and availability.
The Most common diet that fits the above bill is a Mediterranean-type diet.
Mediterranean diet and its variations which typically consists of
· Several servings of fruits and vegetables a day
· Whole-grain breads and cereals
· Healthy fats from nuts, seeds, and olive oil
· Lean protein from poultry, fish, and beans
· Limited amounts of red meat
· Moderate wine consumption with meals .

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