Constipation

Constipation is irregular, infrequent or difficult passage of faeces. It is most often defined as having a bowel movement less than 3 times per week and often associated with hard stools or problems passing stools. People may suffer from pain while passing stools or may be unable to have a bowel movement after straining or pushing. It is the most common physiological disorder of the alimentary tract. It is characterized by incomplete evacuation of hard, dried stools. It occurs commonly in children, adolescents, adults on low fibre diets, patients confined to bed, in individuals and in elderly persons.

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Constipation is a common gastrointestinal problem, which causes many expenses for the community with an estimated prevalence of 1% to 80%, worldwide, where the condition is characterized by a wide geographical variation. Constipation is common during cancer treatment.

Types of Constipation

There are three main types of constipation:

Atonic constipation (lazy bowel): There is loss of muscle tone causing weak peristalsis due to lack of fluids, roughage and potassium, vitamin B Complex deficiency, irregular defecation habit and poor personelhygiene, excessive purgation or use of enema, sedentary lifestyle or lack of exercise.
Spastic constipation: It results from excessive tone of the colonic muscle.
Obstructive constipation: It occurs usually due to obstruction in the colon, cancer or any other obstruction due to inflammation or narrowing of the lumen.

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Causes of Constipation

. Constipation can occur with:

  1. Overuse of laxatives (stool softeners)
  2. Low-fiber diet
  3. Lack of physical activity
  4. Not drinking enough water
  5. Delay in going to the bathroom when you have the urge to move your bowels
  6. Stress and travel can also contribute to constipation or other changes in bowel habits.
  7. A change in regular routine or travelling
  8. Use of medications such as antacids with aluminum or calcium, antidepressants, antihistamines, narcotics (such as codeine), antispasmodics, diuretics, tranquilizers, some heart medications
  9. Use of supplements such as iron and calcium
  10. Health conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, colorectal cancer, eating disorders, under-active thyroid, diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, celiac disease, and depression

. Other causes of constipation may include:

  1. Colon cancer
  2. Diseases of the bowel, such as –  irritable bowel syndrome
  3. Mental health disorders
  4. Nervous system disorder.
  5. Pregnancy.

Possible complications

Possible complications from constipation include:

• Hemorrhoids
• Cracks or tears in the rectum
• Weakening of the muscles and ligaments that hold the rectum in place
• Blockage of stool in the large intestine
• Faecal impaction is defined as the retention of solid faeces that prevents spontaneous evacuation.

Faecal impaction is common in care homes and can lead to faecal incontinence. This is a costly consequence of untreated constipation. A related term is faecal loading, which describes the retention of faeces of any consistency.

Risk of constipation in Elderly people

For older adults in the community and in care settings, the risk of developing constipation may be increased by:

• Muscular weakness that limits general movement and the possibility of physical exercise as well as the ability to visit shops and carry shopping.
• Less mobile patients who experience a loss of sensation, or those who ignore the signal to empty their bowels to avoid inconveniencing a carer or because the toilets are inaccessible. In care settings, they may be offered a bed pan or commode and be unable to empty their bowels due to poor positioning or lack of privacy.
• Changes in the diet, including patients reducing fluid and fibre intake for fear of incontinence
• Difficulty swallowing, which results in requirement for thickened fluids and modified consistency diets. This can restrict consumption of adequate fibre and fluid
• Poor dentition, which can impact on dietary intake, including fibre-containing foods
• Limited care assistance available at mealtimes for dependent individuals, to ensure appropriate diet and fluid provision.
• Development of co-morbid medical conditions and resulting poly-pharmacy including, in particular, analgesics and psychotropic drugs.
• Mental health disorders such as depression, anxiety, dementia and cognitive impairment.
• Use of a number of medicines that induce constipation, including antacids, calcium and iron supplements, as well as radiotherapy and opioid pain relief for cancer treatment.
• Socio-environmental factors including hospitalization and institutionalization.

Medications that can contribute to constipation include:

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1. Pain medications (narcotics)
2. Antihistamines
3. Antidepressant and anti-psychotic medications
4. Some seizure medications
5. Iron supplements
6. Sucralfate and some antacids such as TUMS
7. Some blood pressure medications

Treatment:

1. Behavior changes: It is best to establish a regular pattern of bowel movement. People who have a normal bowel pattern usually defecate at approximately the same time every day. Since the bowels are most active after awakening and after meals, the most optimal time for a bowel movement is usually within the first two hours after waking and after breakfast. When the signals to defecate are ignored, these signals become weaker and weaker over time. Encouraging and allowing persons to pay attention to these signals can help decrease constipation.

2. Laxatives: Laxatives are substances that can help relieve constipation. However, the long-term use of laxatives can make your body depend on them. Talk to your health care provider about the use of laxatives to manage your constipation.
Fibre supplements are widely available and can be found in forms such as powders, tablets and capsules. If you have trouble eating enough fibre and want to use fibre supplements, check with your health care provider first.
Bulk forming laxatives are natural or synthetic products that have a laxative effect by absorbing water and increasing faecal mass.

3. Diet: For long term treatment it is always preferable to choose for a proper dietary management because intake of laxatives for a long period is not good for health. Increasing intake of fiber and fluid may help to feel less constipated and bloated.

Nutritional guidelines for alleviating constipation:

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When we experience constipation, it may be beneficial to include more insoluble fibre in the diet to promote regularity. It is important to increase fibre slowly over the course of a few weeks. Adding too much fibre too quickly can make constipation worse. Insoluble Fibre is not digested by the body and is excreted as waste. This is the type of fibre that promotes bowel regularity and discourages the development of haemorrhoids. Examples of foods that contain insoluble fibre include wheat bran, nuts, seeds, and skins on vegetables and fruits.

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• Drink plenty of liquids.
• Gradually increase  fibre intake.
• Eat 3-5 servings of fruits and vegetables daily.
• Choose foods that promote regularity.
• Try plum or prune juice.
• Try to include exercise or physical activity in  daily routine.
• Talk to your healthcare team about medication or supplements to help with constipation.

Proper dietary and lifestyle management can help in maintaining the normal bowel movements to a great extent. Medical interventions are required only when constipation arises because of some structural or functional change in the gastrointestinal tract.

Exercise and Constipation

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Exercise therapy has shown significant efficacy as a means of treating various intestinal diseases. Exercise, especially aerobic exercise, may be a viable and effective treatment for patients with constipation. Exercise helps constipation by lowering the time it takes food to move through the large intestine. This limits the amount of water that our body absorbs from the stool. Hard, dry stools are harder to pass. Aerobic exercise speeds up your breathing and heart rate. This helps to stimulate the natural squeezing (or contractions) of muscles in our intestines. Intestinal muscles that squeeze better will help to move stools out quickly. A regular walking plan — even 10 to 15 minutes several times a day can help the body and digestive system work at their best. Aerobic exercise includes running, jogging, swimming, or swing dancing, for example. All of these exercises can help keep the digestive tract healthy. Stretching may also help ease constipation, and yoga may, too.

 

You can join the programme of Foodnwellness. This program gives you a personalized plan that includes the key to eat the right quantity of food and healthier options that you need to eat for Constipation and will also motivate you to have a healthy lifestyle. You may receive plenty of advice from everywhere but it is worthy when you receive correct knowledge from panel of health professionals. Foodnwellness will always guide regarding every issue you face and it will be taken care of by our Dietitians.

Quinoa salad

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Quinoa salad

  • Author: Meenu Agarwal
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Category: Salad
  • Cuisine: Indian
  • Diet: Low Calorie

Description

This nutritious Quinoa Sala is easy to prepare and is a quick make which can be consumed as a snack or even a Breakfast/Lunch/Dinner meal option with a side bowl of healthy soup.  Quinoa is a great source of protein and is an  ideal choice for someone who follows a vegetarian diet as it contains all 9 essential amino acids.


Ingredients

  • Water-1 – 3/4 cups
  • Uncooked quinoa -1 cup
  • Tomato-½ cup coarsely chopped seeded
  • Coriander leaves- ½ cup chopped
  • Peanuts- ¼ cup roasted
  • Raisins-1/4th cup
  • Cucumber- ¼ cup chopped
  • Green chilies – ½ tsp. finely chopped 
  • Lemon juice- ¼ cup fresh
  • Extra virgin olive oil-1 tbsp.
  • Onion-finely chopped 1 tbsp.
  • Salt-1/2 tsp.
  • Black pepper powder -1/4th tsp.

Instructions

  1. Combine water and quinoa in a medium saucepan, bring boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 20 minutes or until water is absorbed.
  2. Remove from heat; fluff with fork.
  3. Stir in the remaining ingredients.
  4. Cover, let stand for an hour.
  5. Serve chilled or at room temperature.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 4
  • Calories: 193kcal
  • Fat: 5g
  • Carbohydrates: 32g
  • Fiber: 5.5g
  • Protein: 5g

Baked yogurt bread rolls

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Baked yogurt bread rolls

  • Author: Meenu Agarwal
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Cuisine: Indian
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Description

These easy baked yoghurt bread rolls are light and delicious. These can be a part of your weekend breakfast or even dinner options apart from being served as an evening snack option.


Scale

Ingredients

-2 slices bread fresh
-1 tsp mustard sauce – to spread
– 1 tbsp. – toned milk
-1/2tsp carom seeds (Ajwain)

FILLING
– 1 tbsp. hung curd
– 1 tbsp. finely chopped red bell peppers deseeded or deseeded chopped tomato
– 1/2 cup finely chopped broccoli
– 1 tbsp. peas
– ½ green chili – deseeded & chopped
– 1/2tsp salt and black pepper
– 1/4tsp red chili flakes


Instructions

1) Boil 1 cup water with ½ tsp salt
2) Mash peas with the hands.
3) Put the hung curd in a bowl. Add all other ingredients of the filling to the curd.
4) Cut the sides of slice, keep it flat on a rolling board. Press, applying gentle pressure with a rolling pin so that holes of the bread close.
5) Spread ½ tsp mustard on the slice.
6) Spread a layer of filling. Roll carefully. Seal end by applying some curd. Press well.
7) Brush milk on roll. Spread some carom seeds on a plate
8) At serving time, cover a wire rack of oven with foil. Grease foil lightly. Place the rolls. Grill for about 5 minutes till edges turn little golden. Serve immediately.



Nutrition

  • Serving Size: Serves 2
  • Calories: 235kcal
  • Fat: 8g
  • Carbohydrates: 90g
  • Protein: 20g

Moong Dal Cheela/Pancake Recipe

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Moong Dal Cheela/Pancake Recipe

  • Author: Mubarra
  • Prep Time: 5 - 10 Minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 Minutes
  • Total Time: 12 minute
  • Category: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snack
  • Cuisine: Indian
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Description

Moong dal Cheela/Pancake is a healthy, delicious and quick to make recipe that can be consumed as a breakfast or snack item. It can be made with minimal ingredients and within minutes given, that the Moong dal is soaked overnight or for few hours before preparation. It can be served without any sides but it tastes best when served with homemade chutneys/pickle/curd/raita.

 


Scale

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup Moong Dal (whole or split with husk) 
  • 1 tablespoon Green Peas
  • 1 tablespoon Water
  • 2 teaspoons of finely chopped Onion
  • 1/4 teaspoon of finely chopped Ginger 
  • 1/4 teaspoon of finely chopped  Coriander leaves 
  • Salt to taste
  • 1/4  teaspoon of finely chopped Green Chili 
  • 1  teaspoon ghee or Oil

Instructions

  • Wash and soak the moong dal for around 3-4 hours prior to making the batter.
  • Then take the soaked and drained moong dal, blend it in a mixer along with green chillies, green peas, ginger, using little water to make a thick paste.
  • In a bowl, add onion, coriander leaves, salt and the blended moong dal and peas paste.
  • Mix well and add water to make a thin dosa like batter. Remember to add water in small batches to get your desired consistency (Medium thick consistency)
  • Heat a large nonstick frying pan on medium-high heat. Add a little oil to coat the pan.
  • Pour a ladle full of batter when the pan is hot and flatten out until 1cm thick. 
  • Pour a little oil on either side and cook until golden brown.
  • Flip and cook on the other side. 
  • Serve hot with any Chutney/Pickle/Salsa/Curry

Notes

The Moong dal Cheela/Pancake can be stuffed with or topped with vegetables of your choice to make it more nutritionally balanced.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 167.75 Kcal
  • Fat: 5.325 g
  • Carbohydrates: 21.11 g
  • Protein: 8.79 g

Keywords: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snack, healthy, vegetarian, Protein, weightloss

Mixed Vegetables preparation

 

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Mixed Vegetables preparation


Description

This mixed vegetables preparation with added Paneer is not only easy to prepare, but also has the goodness of vegetables and different flavours from the spices used which makes it an overall delectable nutritious dish.


Ingredients

Onion (freshly chopped) – 1 medium

Mushrooms – 6 – 8 (sliced)

French beans – 4 – 6 (chopped)

Green capsicum – ¼ (chopped)

Yellow bell pepper – ¼ (chopped)

Tomato (deseeded) – ¼ (chopped)

Cauliflower florets – 2-3

Paneer – 100 gms

Carrot – ½ (chopped)

Green peas (boiled) – ½ cup

Salt – to taste

Turmeric powder – ½ tsp

Red chili powder – 1 tsp

Coriander powder – 1 tsp

Garam Masala – ½ tsp

Tandoori Masala – 1 tsp

Ginger Garlic paste – 1 tsp


Instructions

1) Take a heavy bottomed kadhai. Add oil and heat it. Add cumin seeds and sauté for a minute.

2) Add chopped onions and stir well. Sauté till transparent. Add salt and mix well.

3) Add all the above listed chopped vegetables to the sautéed onion and cover it with a lid. Cook for 4-5 minutes on low medium heat stirring occasionally.

4) Add boiled peas and mix well. Cover and cook for another 5 minutes.

5) Add seasonings: Turmeric powder, salt, red chili powder, coriander powder, garam masala, tandoori masala. Mix well.

6) Add chopped deseeded tomato to the pan and mix it well. Cover and cook on low medium heat.

7) Add paneer cubes to the vegetables and mix well. Cover and cook on low medium heat.

8) Add freshly chopped coriander leaves on top. Serve hot and garnish with chopped ginger on the top.



Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 2
  • Calories: 65 - 75 KCAL
  • Fat: 5 - 7 GM
  • Carbohydrates: 15 - 20 GM
  • Protein: 4 - 6 GM

 

Vegetable Salad With Salmon

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VEGETABLE SALAD WITH SALMON


Description

A Vegetable Salad with Salmon is a dish consisting of pieces of food in a mixture, sometimes with at least one raw ingredient. It is often dressed, and is typically served at room temperature or served warm.

Vegetable Salad With Salmon may be served at any point during a meal: appetizer, side dish or main course salads—usually containing a portion of a high-protein foods, such as meat, fish, eggs, legumes, or cheese.

 


Ingredients

  • Salmon (sautéed/ baked) – 1 serving
  • Tomato (diced, seeds removed) – 1 medium
  • Cucumber(diced, seeds removed) – 1 medium
  • Onion, sliced – 14
  • Leaf lettuce – 1-2
  • Lemon juice (about 1 lemon)
  • Olive oil – ½ tsp
  • Black Pepper, to taste
  • Salt – to taste

Instructions

  1. Place salmon, tomato, cucumber and onion in a medium bowl and toss gently to combine.
  2. To make the dressing: place lemon juice in a small bowl. Gradually whisk in olive oil and pepper.
  3. Toss dressing with the salmon and vegetables&Serve.


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 210- 230 KCAL
  • Fat: 18 - 20 GM
  • Carbohydrates: 60 - 80 GM
  • Protein: 25 - 30 GM

Oats Poha

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Oats Poha


Description

Oats Poha is a savoury dish originating from the Indian Subcontinent, most common in South Indian breakfast, cooked as a thick porridge from dry roasted semolina or coarse rice flour. Oats poha is a healthy breakfast and a healthier version of Rice flakes Poha. This can be consumed in the breakfast as well as snack items. Various seasonings and/or vegetables are often added during the cooking, depending on individual preferences. Today it is popular in most parts of India and is prepared in various ways. This recipe is good for weight loss, diabetic and heart diseases as it is rich in fiber.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 cup oats
  • 1 cup vegetables (Chopped carrots, peas, capsicum )
  • 1 tomato medium sized
  • 1 onion thinly sliced medium
  • ¾ cup water (adjust as needed)
  • Salt as needed
  • 1 pinch Turmeric
  • Oil as needed
  • 34 Cashewnuts
  • ½ tsp mustard seeds
  • ¼ tsp red chili powder
  • Coriander leaves as needed

Instructions

  • Dry roast oats until golden or they begin to smell good. Set aside.
  • Heat a pan with oil. Add mustard seeds ,allow to crackle.
  • Add cashew nuts and saute till they are lightly browned
  • Add onions and fry until they turn slightly golden or pink.
  • Saute vegetables carrot, capsicum,  peas for 2 to 3 mins. Add chopped tomatoes, sprinkle salt and turmeric.
  • Cook until the tomatoes turn completely mushy.
  • Add chili powder
  • Mix and fry for 2 to 3 minutes until it smells good.
  • Add water and bring it to a boil.
  • Add oats and stir well.
  • Cover and cook. If needed add more or less water to adjust the consistency.
  • Add coriander leaves.
  • Serve it hot


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 225 Kcal
  • Fat: 3 g
  • Carbohydrates: 30 g
  • Fiber: 5 g
  • Protein: 4 g

Lotus Stem Curry

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LOTUS STEM CURRY


Description

These luscious Lotus sets are a great source of dietary fibre, phytonutrients and other source of vitamins and minerals. It helps reduce stress, water retention and is great for skin, hair and those who have hypertension. They can be boiled, air fried, added into salads or even eaten raw. Try out this lotus stem curry and surprise your friends and family with this delicious treat.


Scale

Ingredients

1 medium size Lotus Stem – cut into small rounds

1 Green Chilly, finely chopped

½ Tsp Cumin

Masalas:

Salt, to taste

1/4 TspTurmeric

½ Tsp Red Chili powder.

1 tspDhania Powder.

¼ tsp garam masala

 


Instructions

  • Thoroughly clean the Lotus Stems by scrubbing off all visible traces of mud off them. Run water through the holes till they are clean.
  • Peel, wash once again and cut into medium sized rounds.
  • In a pressure cooker add the chopped Lotus stem with enough water to cover them, add salt and pressure cook till half cooked (2-3 whistles should be good) When done, keep aside, with the water.
  • Heat a heavy bottomed Kadhai and add Oil to it.
  • When the Oil heats up add the Jeera and wait for it to pop.
  • Add the chopped Green Chilies and sauté till they don’t seem raw anymore.
  • Fry well, till the masalas are cooked and Oil starts leaving the mixture.
  • Add this cooked mix to the semi cooked Lotus Stem in the cooker. Add water if required.
  • Pressure cook till done (2-3 whistles).
  • Serve hot with Rice or chapattis.


Nutrition

  • Calories: 100 - 110 KCAL
  • Fat: 3 - 6 GM
  • Carbohydrates: 14 – 18 GM
  • Protein: 4-6 GM

Fish and vegetable stir fry

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Fish and vegetable stir fry


Description

This healthy Fish stir fry will knock you off your feet and is a light protein packed dish that will keep you full and satisfied all day, which means less cravings. This recipe is rich in Omega 3 fatty acids and B Vitamins and is a sure delectable dish.


Scale

Ingredients

1 tsp vegetable oil

1 serving boneless fish fillets (sliced)

2 medium onions

23 French Beans

23 baby corns (sliced)

¼ carrot (sliced)

¼ Bell pepper

1 tsp. Soy Sauce

1 tsp. Sweet chili sauce

1 tsp. Ginger – Garlic paste

Salt – to taste

Cilantro / Coriander leaves (for garnishing)


Instructions

) Heat oil in a frying pan on high flame. Stir-fry fish fillets for 2-3 mins until cooked through. Transfer it to a plate.2) Add all the vegetables listed above to the same wok. Stir-fry for 3-5 mins until soft.

4) Toss all the vegetables with fish fillets. Add Soy sauce and sweet chili sauce. Serve hot topped with freshly chopped coriander/ cilantro.



Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1
  • Calories: 250 - 260 KCAL
  • Fat: 15 - 18 GM
  • Carbohydrates: 30 - 40 GM
  • Protein: 20 - 23 GM

Coriander chutney

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Coriander chutney


Description

This coriander chutney/dip is a staple in Indian cuisine. Its a vegan, gluten free dip that serves as an accompaniment with idlis/dosas/pancakes/sandwiches/tikkis etc.


Ingredients

Fresh coriander leaves – 1 cup

Ginger – 1 tsp

Lemon Juice – 1 tbsp.

Roasted cumin seeds – ½ tsp

Green chili – 1

Black salt / White salt – as per taste


Instructions

1) In a blender, add all the above listed ingredients. With some water, blend all the ingredients till smooth paste.

2) Check the seasoning and add lemon juice as per taste.

3) Store chutney in a container in a refrigerator and serve as and when required.



Nutrition

  • Calories: 20 - 30 kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 5 - 7 gm
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